Monkey Boot

The history of the humble Monkey Boot dates back to World War 2, worn as standard issue by the Czechoslovakian army, their durability, practicality, and the fact they were inexpensive made them the ideal boot for the foot soldier.

After disappearing for a couple of decades, the Mods gave them a new lease of life in the 60s and 70s. The Monkey Boot soon became part of their fashion stable along with the Harrington Jacket and Levi’s jeans. In the late 70s and 80s, they were adopted by Skinheads, Punks and students. We have been making our own version of the Tricker's Monkey Boot for quite a few years. The most popular market until recently has been Japan where the desire for English apparel is very strong

Although the Monkey boot was made famous during WWII as infantry shoes of the Czechoslovakian army, the design is also reminiscent of old-style boxing boots. After the Second World War, the monkey boot moved in two differing directions. In the US, makers such as Endicott Johnson Company and Weinbrenner Shoe Company adopted the design and produced what is referred to as “roofer” style work boots in the 1950s. Here in the UK, various fashion/lifestyle groups chose a short version of the monkey boot as their footwear uniform, well into the 1980s. This is all contained in the link to our journal post.

They remain hugely popular in Japan among certain fashion circles, and in denim/heritage’ clothing communities. Tricker’s monkey boots being sold there are the 9 eyelet versions, as opposed to the standard 7 eyelet version or sometimes an even shorter 5 eyelet shoe version.